In 2005, Ted had a very good year...
Photos by Pat Shannahan/The Arizona Republic

Ted Purdy, of Phoenix, cheers on Special
Olympics athlete Dale Czarnecki, of Scottsdale,
during the 2005 Viacom Outdoor Special
Olympics Open at the TPC.
Cousin Ted represents at Pebble Beach
By Mark Purdy
Mercury News

You know it. I know it. Everybody is playing for
second place at Pebble Beach today. Phil
Mickelson will win the $954,000 first prize,
unless the rest of the 18th fairway crumbles
under his feet.

The rest of the field will fight for the runner-up
check worth $572,400.

And while no one asked, I can tell you which
of the skilled and talented contenders I like to
win that fight: Ted Purdy.

I say this not because Ted has the same last
name as I do. I say this because . . . all right,
so it's because Ted has the same last name
as I do.

Yet until this week, I had never spoken with
Ted Purdy, despite his status as a rising golf
star who has finished second in two tour
events.

``Honey, have you ever met this Purdy guy
who plays golf?'' my wife asked one day as
we watched an event on television.

``Not really,'' I said. ``How much did they say
he won last year?''

``One point six million dollars.''

``You're right. I really should meet him.''

And so, while covering this year's AT&T
tournament, I made a point to track down Ted.

I found him Saturday at Poppy Hills, where he
was rolling his way to a tie for 16th in the
tournament standings --- just five shots out of
second place.

And when I say rolling, I do mean rolling. On
the par-5 18th hole, Ted made an eagle 3 by
sinking a roller-coaster 50-foot putt up and
over a large mound in the center of the green.
He threw both fists in the air. I whooped a
little myself. Made me proud to be a Purdy.

Afterward, outside the scoring trailer, I
introduced myself and asked Ted to describe
his putt.

``Snake of the world,'' said Ted. ``It's just luck,
from that far. It just happened to go in.''

Modesty runs in the family.

I told Ted how odd it was, coming face to face
with the person responsible for seeing
``PURDY'' flashed on the electronic leader
boards here, or superimposed graphically on
a national sports telecast. That probably
happens a lot if your last name is Woods or
Smith or Johnson. But not with Purdy. There
has never been a famous athlete named
Purdy.

That is, except for my cousin Ted. In a brief
conversation, we determined that our distant
relatives are probably intertwined on some
genealogy chart or another. Ted knew that
the Purdys came here from England and that
we've been in America a long time. I knew the
same information. Ted's grandfather grew up
in Michigan. My grandfather grew up in Ohio.

We also learned of other eerie similarities in
our lives.

Ted weighs 175 pounds and is 31 years old.
I once weighed 175 pounds and can give you
31 excuses why that's no longer the case.

Ted attended the University of Arizona and
earned a degree in finance. I once went to
Arizona to cover spring training when it was
80 degrees.
Ted's two nicknames are ``Purds'' and
``Theo.'' My two nicknames are ``Purd'' and
``That Idiot Columnist.''

Ted's amateur partner here is Herb Kohler,
CEO of Kohler Co., the famous manufacturer
of plumbing products. I have rested in rooms
containing many fine Kohler products over
the years.

In a college tournament, Ted defeated Tiger
Woods by six strokes. In a golf video game, I
beat an electronic Tiger Woods by cheating
six times.

All right, so those are jokes. But here is an
honest-to-Titleist true fact about Ted: He
once wrote a newspaper column. During his
rookie year on the tour in 1999, he filed a
monthly ``diary'' for the Arizona Republic in
his hometown of Phoenix. The columns were
well received. How did he enjoy doing them?

``It was a pain in the butt,'' said Ted. ``It took a
lot of time.''

Yes, we're definitely related. If he happens to
pick up a big check tonight, I hope he
spreads the family wealth. Helped by his
legendary local caddie Bob Conlan, cousin
Ted finished in a tie for 17th here last year.
He loves playing Pebble Beach. This is odd,
given what happened the first time he played
in the AT&T.

It's a sad story. In the second round of the
2003 tournament, Ted teed off on the 10th
hole at Pebble, which means he finished at
No. 9, on the bluffs above the Pacific. In the
remote scoring trailer out there, confusion
reigned over a new wireless scoring system
and somehow, Ted left without signing his
scorecard.

He was disqualified from the tournament. But
he didn't know about it until the next morning,
when he showed up to play the third round at
Spyglass and was told that someone else
was taking his place on the pro-am team
with Kohler.

Steamed to high heaven, Ted nevertheless
regrouped and demanded to play the round,
although the Purdy-Kohler score didn't count.
It must have made an impression on Kohler,
who has asked to be paired with Ted ever
since. The Kohler logo is on Ted's sweater.

``He is the best,'' Kohler said. ``He has the
attitude. He's a grinder. He doesn't say die.
He had a double bogey on the 17th hole
today and he comes back with an eagle at
No. 18. How many people can do that?''

Well, at least one. And his name is Purdy.
Way to represent, cousin Ted.

At the next family reunion, I'm on your team in
the Skins Game.
Podseys cheer Purdy to first-round Hope lead
Larry Bohannan
The Desert Sun
January 27, 2005

LA QUINTA - Ted Purdy had
nothing but appreciation for the
three amateur players he played
with in his debut round in the
Bob Hope Chrysler Classic.

"I'm their teammate, so they're
grinding and cheering me on as
much as they can because my
birdies help their score," Purdy
said.

"They are great support, different
than when you play in a
threesome on the PGA Tour,
where the other two guys in your
group are not necessarily
rooting for you," Purdy added.

"You're only real support is
your caddie inside the ropes."

Learning to deal with the
amateurs in the tournament is a
key element in playing the
Classic successfully.

Each pro plays with a different
three-player amateur team
during the first four days of the
tournament.


With the amateurs in the field
and playing in foursomes with
the pros, the pros need to
understand that the rounds are
not going to be fast.

"We had a wait on the 10th tee
today for about 15 minutes,"
Franklin Langham said after his
65 at La Quinta Country Club.
"There were two or three groups
on the tee, but you know to
expect that. You know when you
play the Hope, it's going to be
that way."

Most pros echoed Purdy's
sentiments about his
experience Wednesday.

"I had a great group of guys,"
Langham said. "The years I've
played, I've always had really
good amateurs to play with,
really considerate. The main
thing for me is to be patient."

The Classic amateurs, ranging
from scratch players to
18-handicappers, are randomly
paired into threesomes and the
pros they play with are also
randomly drawn. But the
amateurs all share a love for the
game and try as much as they
can to stay out of the way of
pros, Purdy said.
"Absolutely, they are conscious
of (the pro's play)," Purdy said.
"Most golfers are in general
conscientious."

Occasionally a player will be too
well-meaning and forget about
his own game. At least that was
the problem for Jay Haas, the
1988 Classic winner, in his
years in the Classic. Haas
started playing the event in 1978
and admits the amateurs were
too much of his focus.

"I think early on in my career in
this event I was always worried
about (the amateurs) having a
good time and maybe spent too
much time with them or didn't
think about my game enough,"
Haas said. "I think maybe six or
eight or 10 years ago, I said, you
know, I can still make them have
a good time and focus on my
game, too. It's a little bit of both."

Some players admit to having
trouble playing and focusing
with amateur partners, but those
golfers generally don't come to
the Classic, anyway.

"It's been this way for a long
time," Robert Damron said. "We
certainly shouldn't try to fix it if it's
not broken. We have a great
field. ... I think it's a great format.
I can understand how some
guys might not like it, but we
play so many tournaments, 72
holes, threesomes on Thursday
and Friday, twosomes on
Saturday and Sunday, that
I like tournaments like this."

Purdy's approach to the amateur
experience sounds more like
the attitude of players from the
1960s and 1970s.

"The amateurs are the ones that
pay my paycheck," Purdy said.
"They're the ones that support
the tour. This is a great
opportunity for us to play, and it's
great for the people that support
us to get to play with us."
A 68 loses ground in this tourney
Larry Bohannan
January 28, 2005

Ted Purdy was frustrated, and it was
the kind of frustration golfers find only
at the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic.

"I've shot 68 and I've fallen behind the
leaders a few shots," Purdy said. "It's
more about the score, and the
position in the tournament."

A 4-under 68 at La Quinta Country
Club might sound good, but Purdy
knew when he signed the score card
it's not the kind of round to keep you in
contention in the Classic. Purdy was
an overnight leader after the first
round with a 64, but the 68 dropped
him into a tie for ninth, five shots
behind leader Joe Ogilvie.

So the questions become --- can a
prosurvive a bad round at the Classic
to win, and just what constitutes a
bad round in Bob Hope's tournament?

Generally, the answer is try and shoot
a low round every day, don't be afraid
to accept a low, low round and try to
turn your bad round into a 68.

"If you feel like everything is in your
wheel house, you'd better shoot as
low as you possibly can because
there might be that one day where
things aren't going in or your
yardages aren't right or something,"
Tim Herron said after his 64 at the
Palmer Course at PGA West.
Herron said after his 64 at the Palmer
Course at PGA West.

If 70 is now the number that eliminates a
player from winning the Classic, then the
top 17 players on the leader board starting
today are still alive for the title. But even
those players know that 64 every day isn't
going to happen, so winning might mean
taking a day of 68 or 69.

"I don't know if pace is the right word.
You've got to know that five days is a long
tournament," Billy Mayfair said after a 64 on
Thursday that left him four shots out of the
lead. "Usually out of five days you're going
to have one day that maybe not everything
drops for you. If you have a pretty good
score on that day, you're right where you
want to be."

So keep an eye on the scoreboard today
and see which golfer can't break 70. That
player likely won't be holding up the crystal
trophy Sunday afternoon. The player who
shoots 70 will be the one headed to the
range for a little practice and to work off a
bit of frustration.
'A lot of fun'
Raul Dominguez Jr.
Express-News

A great massage, good lesson and "really
amazing" Ping G2 driver boosted Ted Purdy
into the first round lead of the Texas Open.
He shot a bogey-free round and tying the
18-hole tournament record Thursday.

Purdy, who is seeking his first PGA Tour
victory after two close seconds this year, hit
all 18 greens in regulation and landed safely in
17 of 18 fairways.

"I hit the ball better today than I have maybe
ever in my life," Purdy said.

A lesson Monday with Pam Barnett was
critical, as was using the Ping G2 driver, but a
big thanks was reserved for masseuse Jim
Weathers, who gave Purdy a massage
Wednesday night that he said loosened him
up and allowed him to swing freely.

"I was relaxed," Purdy said, "and the club was
on plane and I was hitting it far and square. It
was a lot of fun."

Purdy birdied four-consecutive holes, beginning
with a 10-foot putt on his second
hole, the par-4 11th.

After a par on the first hole, Purdy birdied the
second with a 2-foot putt and the third with a
6-footer.

"I got it to 6 under and I thought 'I can shoot
59 if something special happens on the last
six holes,'" Purdy said.

He had birdie opportunities inside 10 feet on
the fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh holes but
missed each attempt.

"I was getting frustrated that the putts
weren't going in at that point," Purdy said.
"My caddie (Paul Jungman) said, 'Be kind to
my man.' He was telling me to be kind to
myself and I kind of relaxed."

The comfort level grew more when Purdy
holed a sand wedge from 71 yards on a blind
shot from the eighth fairway for an eagle on
the par-4 hole.

Energized by the eagle, Purdy picked up his
seventh birdie after hitting his approach shot
on the ninth green to within 10 feet.
"I got it to 6 under and I thought 'I can shoot
59 if something special happens on the last
six holes,'" Purdy said.

He had birdie opportunities inside 10 feet on
the fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh holes but
missed each attempt.

"I was getting frustrated that the putts
weren't going in at that point," Purdy said.
"My caddie (Paul Jungman) said, 'Be kind to
my man.' He was telling me to be kind to
myself and I kind of relaxed."

The comfort level grew more when Purdy
holed a sand wedge from 71 yards on a blind
shot from the eighth fairway for an eagle on
the par-4 hole.

Energized by the eagle, Purdy picked up his
seventh birdie after hitting his approach shot
on the ninth green to within 10 feet.
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